06/12/09

Islam in Urdu

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Posted by Engr. Muhammad Maroof | Posted in | Posted on 4:06 AM

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Islam in Urdu

Islam in Urdu
Islam in Urdu

Computer Problems in Urdu

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Posted by Engr. Muhammad Maroof | Posted in | Posted on 3:59 AM

Computer Problems in Urdu


Computer Problems in Urdu
Computer Problems in Urdu

Computer Problems in Urdu


Computer Problems in Urdu

Recipes in Urdu

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Posted by Engr. Muhammad Maroof | Posted in | Posted on 3:49 AM

Recipes in Urdu


Recipes in Urdu

Delhi – A Tale of More Than Two Bazaars

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Posted by Engr. Muhammad Maroof | Posted in | Posted on 3:42 AM

Delhi – A Tale of More Than Two Bazaars


Urdu bazaar
One of the most vibrant and interesting areas of Delhi is the Jama Masjid and its environs with its many bazaars. Urdu Bazaar specializes in rare books, old manuscripts and journals. There are shops that stock Catherine wheels and enormous rockets which when fired burst into clouds of twinkling stars. Also on sale are colourful caps, pictures of sacred places, sizzling kababs, savoury pulaos, stuffed parathas served with yoghurt, halwa and delectable sweets.




You can see piles of rose petals and smell their fragrance. The air is scented with fresh bread, cauldrons of thickening sweet milk, spices, curies, incense and tobacco. Tame pigeons flutter down from a minaret to perch on the unwary.




Visitors are greeted with cries of the shopkeepers, coolies (porters) and rickshawallas, clatters and whirres of furious industry. Near the steps of the Jama Masjid, you find old fashioned heavy flat-irons put up for sale. Each has a number indicating its weight. Then there are shops that deal in car parts with a complete range form smallest ball bearing to an engine. Much of it is piled up outside for customers’ inspection. For bibliophiles, the attractions are books on Indology and special hand-made paper.




All these newer bazaars have taken the place of the Gudri Bazaar. This bazaar at Shahjahanbad extended to the entire open space between Khas and Khanam Ka Bazaar, not far form Delhi Gate. This particular area was known as Chowk Saadullah Khan after Shah Jahan’s Prime Minister. The Chowk, as described by Nawab Salar Jung during Muhammad Shah’ reign, hummed with activity. Astrologers made pleasing prophecies, preachers waxed eloquent on a number of themes and quacks advertised their tonics and remedies. There were wine-sellers; vendors selling dry fruits, exotic birds and animals. The cages for these creatures exhibited a high standard of workmanship, artistic design and fetched exhorbitant prices.





A few years after the conquest of Delhi in 1857, the British demolished and cleared the Khas and Khanam Ka Bazaar and open areas around including the Chowk Saadullah Khan. The army authorities took over and Delhi became an army camp.




After clearance an open market grew up around Jama Masjid and on its steps. Sellers of pet animals gave way to dealers in well trained birds like pigeons, mynahs, parrots, and partridges. There were customers who would come everyday to buy them. The seller were in great demand. Among them was the famous Masita, making and selling hot kababs skewered on his iron rod. A renowned story teller would sit on the steps of Jama Masjid surrounded by fascinated listeners.




Salesmanship developed into a fine art, mixed with good-humoured banter. The man selling a trained pigeon to a customer would claim: “This bird is so well trained that it will never leave your house. It will fly high every day. Just keep a large vessel of water in your courtyard and you will never lose sight of its reflection in the water.” Sellers of kababs also resorted to hyperbolic cries to hawk their wares. Before selling his miracle cures, the hakim would spend time raving against quacks.




Shopkeepers at the Gudri Bazaars were temperamental. If they did not approve of your attire, mannerism or speech, nothing was sold and you would be the loser. Id was a specially busy day when the rich and poor congregated at the mosque for prayers. Flowers in large baskets added colour to the summer’s day. Water carriers with leather skins on their backs and two cups in their hands, hummed a tune, offering you the sweetest water from a newly constructed well.




The karkhandars (artisans) also called the chawani walas, were constantly in high spirits. They loved the theatre, acting and music and were patrons of bioscope and circus.




Fourteen years ago, before the dilapidated shacks in the open market were demolished, buyers could spend many hours shopping. If you needed vital spare parts for a vintage car, woolen coats in fashion over two decades ago, quilts, furniture, old handwritten manuscripts or even rare books, Gudri Bazaar was just the place where you could strike a good bargain.

Andaz-e-Bayan Parveen Shakir

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Posted by Engr. Muhammad Maroof | Posted in | Posted on 3:38 AM

Andaz-e-Bayan Parveen Shakir


Andaz-e-Bayan Parveen Shakir

Karachi Urdu Bazaar building fire put out

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Posted by Engr. Muhammad Maroof | Posted in | Posted on 3:34 AM

Karachi Urdu Bazaar building fire put out


KARACHI: A building in Urdu Bazaar suddenly caught fire on Saturday, which gutted at least three shops, where books and copies were burned out. However, the fire was extinguished.

There were godowns of books in the upper storeys of the building. The blaze reached the upper storeys before long; however, there was no one at the time of the blaze incident happened.

The fire brigade personnel faced hardships as the whole building was awash with smoke.

Karachi Fire Officer Ihteshaamud Din arrived on the spot as soon e was apprised of the incident and inspected the fire-fighting operation there. A snorkel and four fire-brigade vehicles took part in the operation.

According to preliminary reports, the fire was caused by the electric short circuit.

URDU Mehfil-e-Mushaira

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Posted by Engr. Muhammad Maroof | Posted in | Posted on 3:28 AM

URDU Mehfil-e-Mushaira

Parveen Shakir

apni ruswai tere nam ka charcha dekhun
ek zara sher kahun aur main kya kya dekhun

nind a jaye to kya mahfilen barpa dekhun
ankh khul jaye to tanhai ka sahra dekhun

sham bhi ho gai dhundhala gai ankhen bhi meri
bhulnewale main kab tak tera rasta dekhun

sab ziden us ki main puri karun har bat sunun
ek bache ki tarah se use hansta dekhun

mujh pe cha jaye wo barsat ki khushbu ki tarah
ang ang apna usi rut main mahakta dekhun

tu meri tarah se yakta hai magar mere habib
ji main ata hai koi aur bhi tujh sa dekhun

main ne jis lamhe ko puja hai use bas ek bar
khwab ban kar teri ankhon main utarta dekhun

tu mera kuch nahin lagta hai magar jan-e-hayat
jane kyon tere liye dil ko dharakta dekhun

Parveen Shakir Poetry

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Posted by Engr. Muhammad Maroof | Posted in | Posted on 3:21 AM

>>پروین شاکر

Parveen Shakir

Ajib tarz-e-mulaqat ab k bar rahi

tumhin the badle hue ya meri nigahen thin
tumhari nazron se lagta tha jaise meri bajaye
tumhare ghar main koi aur shakhs aya hai
tumhare ohad ki denen tumhen mubarak

so tum ne mera swagat usi tarah se kiya
jo afsaran-e-hukumat k aitaqad main hai
takallufan mere nazdik a k baith gaye
phir ehtamam se mausam ka zikr cher diya

kuch us k bad siyasat ki bat bhi nikli
adab par bhi koi do char tabsare faramaye
magar na tum ne hamesha ki tarah ye pucha
kya waqt kaisa guzarta hai tera jan-e-hayat

pahar din ki aziyat main kitni shiddat hai
ujar rat ki tanhai kya qayamat hai
shabon ki sust rawi ka tujhe bhi shikwa hai
gam-e-firaq k qisse nishat-e-wasl ka zikr
rawayatan hi sahi koi bat to karte

urdu poetry by Parveen Shakir

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Posted by Engr. Muhammad Maroof | Posted in | Posted on 3:17 AM

urdu poetry by Parveen Shakir

paa-ba-gil sab hai.n rihaa_ii kii kare tadabiir kaun
dast-bastaa shahar me.n khole merii zanjiir kaun

[rihaa_ii = freedom; tadabiir = solution/way]
[dast-bastaa = tied hands]

meraa sar haazir hai lekin meraa munsif dekh le
kar rahaa hai mere fard-e-jurm kii tahariir kaun

[munsif = judge; fard-e-jurm = tale of guilt]
[tahariir = writing]

aaj darvaazo.n pe dastak jaanii pahachaanii sii hai
aaj mere naam laataa hai merii taaziir kaun

[taaziir = punishment]

niind jab Khvaabo.n se pyaarii ho to aise ahad me.n
Khvaab dekhe kaun aur Khvaabo.n ko de taabiir kaun

[ahad = era/times]

ret abhii pichhale makaano.n kii na vaapas aa_ii thii
phir lab-e-saahil gharaundaa kar gayaa taamiir kaun

[lab-e-saahil = on the shoreline; taamiir = construct]

saare rishte hijrato.n me.n saath dete hai.n to phir
shahar se jaate hue hotaa hai daaman_giir kaun

merii chaadar to chhinii thii shaam kii tanhaa_ii ne
beridaa_ii ko merii phir de gayaa tashahiir kaun

dushmano.n ke saath mere dost bhii aazaad hai.n
dekhanaa hai khe.nchataa hai mujh pe pahalaa tiir kaun